How to spot a faulty BYOD plan

How to spot a faulty BYOD plan

Given the benefits of the bring your own device movement, it's easy for business leaders to go straight ahead with a mobility policy without ever looking back. Unfortunately, some companies find out the hard way that hastily implementing a BYOD plan can do more harm than good. Enterprise mobility can be a blessing or a curse – the outcome depends on how well company leaders design their strategies. Here are a few signs that could indicate future BYOD disaster:

Lack of training
Most employees will probably be more than eager to begin using their personal devices for work. It's up to company leaders to make sure that BYOD participants don't get ahead of themselves. As a recent InformationWeek article pointed out, successful mobility plans involve employee training. Workers must be taught how to act responsibly with their new mobile privileges. Without BYOD training, employees could unknowingly be putting their firm's data at risk of leakage.

Paranoid policies
While it's important for companies to ensure their data is being safeguarded, that does not mean that IT leaders should be given unrestricted surveillance of workers' smartphones. BYOD participants should not feel that they are being spied on, so company leaders need to create a fair balance between data security and employee privacy. Business News Daily posited geo-tracking as an example of an unnecessary BYOD fixture. Similarly, giving IT leaders access to personal documents and apps is a sure way to alienate employees.

No structure
The implementation of BYOD results in a large supply of corporate data spread across many devices, and the results can be ugly without a proper system of organization set in place. By adopting a unified communications suite, companies allow employees to access a vast range of data on one central location. Unified messaging services enable workers to streamline communications and effectively correspond with clients whether in the office, at home or on the go.